Tuesday July 31, 2018

August 4th, 2018

From Naturalist Beth

This morning was AMAZING! We started off our trip with three fin whales traveling together, it’s so impressive to see these whales interact with each other. We also passed by four different minke whales. A few miles away we found a LARGE pod of Atlantic white-sided dolphins spread out throughout the area. It was a perfect, calm day for watching dolphins. We could watch the dolphins as they swam beneath the surface, a group of them coming by to check out our boat. Most of them played in our boat wake, jumping clear out of the water.

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Near the pod we spotted an ocean sunfish (or mola mola). These fish can weigh up to 5,000 pounds!!! The mola swam right by our boat giving passengers a really close look. Image00053

We ended our trip with close looks at 3 humpback whales, although there were a few more in the area. We watched Satula, and Raccoon with his unknown travel companion. Great morning out on the water!

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This afternoon we started our trip with two fin whales traveling separately through the area. Three minke whales were also nearby. We spent the majority of our trip with 6 different humpback whales including Satula, Pinball, Raccoon, Wizard, and Crystal.

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Crystal is the 1980 calf of Salt, a famous Gulf of Maine humpback whale. Salt is one of the most well-known humpback whales in the world. Crystal was the first calf of Salt that we started tracking. It was great to see him out on the water today!

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Sunday, July 29, 2018

August 3rd, 2018

From Naturalist Beth:

This morning we started off our trip with amazing looks at a group of 4 fin whales! Ladder was spotted in the group again! The whales stayed up for multiple breaths, we got some amazing close looks!

Ladder and friend

Nearby, we found a pod of Atlantic white-sided dolphins! It is ALWAYS a special treat to see them out on the water. We finished up our trip with great looks at Hornbill, the humpback whale!Hornbill

This afternoon we found Hornbill again in Ipswich Bay, he was doing some feeding in the area. Nearby, a few minke whales traveled through the area. We also found three fin whales!

Saturday, July 28, 2018

August 3rd, 2018

From Naturalist Beth:

This morning in Ipswich Bay we started our trip with amazing looks at 3 fin whales traveling together! In the group we spotted Ladder, a presumed male fin whale. It isn’t every day that we see a known fin whale! We also spent time with Dyad, the humpback whale, and her calf. Both whales surfacing right next to the boat. Great morning out on the water!Ladder

This afternoon we spent time with three fin whales and Dyad and calf. There were also a few minke whales milling around the area as well!

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Friday, July 27, 2018

July 28th, 2018

From Naturalist Beth

This morning we traveled to the whales through the Annisquam River. It was a great break from the fog this morning.

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We spent most of our trip with three large fin whales, including Ladder. He is a presumed male that tends to frequent our area.

Ladder!

Ladder!

He was traveling with two companions, we were able to keep track of them, even in the fog and got some amazing close looks. We rarely see fin whales traveling together but it is one of the most impressive sightings to see out on the water.

Ladder and friend

Ladder and friend

In the same area, as the fog lifted, we found two humpback whales! Jabiru and her calf were traveling through the area. Jabiru staying down on longer dives while the calf surfaced right next to our boat. We also saw a minke whale passing through the area. Great morning!

Jabiru

Jabiru

This afternoon the fog lifted and we found two whales that we didn’t spot this morning. We spent our time with Nine and Milkyway, two female humpback whales not far off the coast of Rockport, Mass.

Nine and Milkyway

Nine and Milkyway

Nine

Nine

The whales spent time right next to the boat, Nine tail breached off of our stern. We got some amazing close looks at the pair!

Friday, July 20, 2018

July 21st, 2018

From Naturalist Kayla:

This morning we spent a good amount of time with a pod of 30 or more Atlantic white sided dolphins. The water was so clear this morning, that we were able to see the dolphin’s white and yellow coloration through the surface of the water. At one point, there were dolphins surrounding the boat on both sides, it was incredible. We then moved on to see a male humpback whale named Hornbill. Hornbill was blowing bubble clouds and feeding beneath the surface. He took very short dives and gave the crowd some great looks, close to the boat. Throughout the whole trip we also had a baby harbor seal following our boat.

The afternoon trip was just as exciting as the morning. We were able to spend time on a finback whale, who surfaced very close to the boat. We moved on from the finback whale to spend time with a group of three female humpback whales, who have been seen together the past couple of weeks. At one point all three, Clamp, Milkyway and Nine were associating, but Clamp then split and started feeding on her own. She did some tail flicks and slapped the surface of the water, diving down, then surfacing with a mouth full of saltwater and fish. It was very unique to see that type of feeding behavior. Milkyway and Nine were also feeding together, using a technique called bubble clouds. We were able to get amazing looks at the under side of their flukes, and the crowd loved it.

Wed, July 18, 2018

July 18th, 2018

From Naturalist Beth:

This morning we traveled to the southern end of Jeffreys Ledge. There we found two humpback whales, Nine and Milkyway, both females. The whales spent the majority of the trip resting at the surface, at one point deciding to orient their behaviors towards the Miss Cape Ann. Close to boat behavior is one of the rarest behaviors we see from these humpback whales. The passengers could easily tell how excited the crew was. We got some amazing close looks at Nine as she hung right underneath our bow, fluking so close to us it almost seemed like she was going to touch the boat. These whales have an amazing sense of where the boats are, they are always very aware of our location, but rarely decide to come that close. Perfect morning out on the water!

This afternoon we found Nine and Milkway again in the same area. The females continued to rest at the surface. Nine surfaced right next to our boat multiple times, definitely attempting to grab a closer look at us. It’s always an amazing day when the whale watch turns into a “people watch!” Nine and Milkyway hung right next to our boat for several minutes, giving us some incredible looks! At the end of the trip, Nine tail breached twice! We ended up seeing two of the rarest behaviors that we see out on the water this afternoon. Lucky day indeed!

Sunday, July 15, 2018

July 17th, 2018

From Naturalist Beth

This morning we traveled back to Ipswich Bay where we found two female humpback whales, Nine and Milkyway, taking a little snooze. The whales stayed at the surface, our Captain Marc was able to turn off our engines and give our passengers a nice, quiet look at the pair. We also found the male humpback whale, Hornbill, in the area as well. He was taking longer dives. We also had a minke whale pass by our boat too! We were treated to another ride through Annisquam River this morning! Our passengers have been very lucky the last couple days!

This afternoon we started off our trip with Atlantic white-sided dolphins! We don’t see dolphins on every trip, even though they are always a favorite. This particular species tends to spend more time offshore in the cooler waters. We also saw the humpback whales, Nine and Milkyway, relaxing again this afternoon. We traveled back to Gloucester close to both Straitsmouth and Thatcher Islands giving our passengers an incredible look at the beautiful Cape Ann shoreline.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

July 17th, 2018

From Naturalist Beth

This morning we covered a lot of ground on Jeffreys Ledge. We spotted 4 different minke whales and 2 fin whales! Closer to shore in Ipswich Bay we found 2 humpback whales, Clamp and Hornbill. Clamp was doing some feeding right next to the boat. Our Captain, Marc, brought us back to Gloucester Harbor through the Annisquam River. This morning was a whale watch turned sightseeing cruise! Passengers were treated to a beautiful ride back to Gloucester.

This afternoon brought us to the southwestern corner of Stellwagen Bank! Which means our boat traveled from the coast of New Hampshire in the morning to Cape Cod in the afternoon. There we found about 6 different humpback whales! We spent our time with Doublet, Freckles, Draco, and Cardhu. Freckles and Draco were traveling together and surfaced right next to our boat! One of our last looks of the day was Draco coming up out of the water with a huge open mouth! Great afternoon out on the water!

Monday, July 16, 2018

July 17th, 2018

From Naturalist Kayla

It was a foggy trip out to Jeffrey’s Ledge today but the seas were calm and cooperative. We even managed to spot a Grey seal on our way out. We spent our trip watching a group of three female Humpback whales, Milky Way, Nine and Clamp. The group was resting and only took one deep dive while we watched them, showing us the underside of their flukes. We did see some light activity from the whales such as tail breaching and rolling. Overall it was a great trip, as you usually don’t see three Humpback whales associating in a group together.

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Friday, July 13, 2018

July 14th, 2018

From Naturalist Beth

This morning on our way to Stellwagen Bank we spotted Crown, the humpback whale, she was staying down on long dives so we decided to keep making our way towards the bank. There we found three different humpback whales, Cardhu, Etch-a-Sketch, and Milkweed. All three females were milling through the area. Etch-a-Sketch and Cardhu came up feeding together right in front of our boat.

This afternoon we traveled back to Stellwagen Bank, a little farther south than this morning. We started our trip with Serengeti the humpback whale, first seen in 2010. We also watched a minke whale come up right next to our boat while waiting for Serengeti to surface again. We also saw Etch-a-Sketch in the area, she tail breached twice. In response, Cardhu started slapping her tail on the surface (a behavior we call lobtailing) and flipper slapping right next to the boat. It was certainly an unexpected surprise. It was great to see rare surface active behavior this afternoon!